Monthly Archives: May 2013

RV Fits: The Keplerian Solution

Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler

We looked at deriving the radial velocity equation a little here but for the sake of this discussion, we will recover some of the material and expand on it. Furthermore, while modelling the radial velocity curve was described here, it was done so from the perspective of statistics and data, as opposed to actually modelling the stellar reflex velocity from of the gavitational influence of a planet. In hind sight, maybe it is this article which should have been titled “making waves.” I will seek to clarify the physical modelling of the radial velocity curve itself, and how the orbital orientation of the planet plays into how the Keplerian radial velocity curve is shaped.

The radial velocity equation is heavily reliant on Kepler’s Laws of Planetary Motion which govern the shape and periods of the orbits of planets and stars. As such, any fits to radial velocity data using the radial velocity equation is called a Keplerian fit. A Keplerian fit is therefore a fit to RV data that is effectively a model of the motion of the star as expected from Kepler’s Laws.

If you recall, the radial velocity equation is given by

\displaystyle V_r(t) = K[\cos(\epsilon+\omega)+e\cos(\omega)]+\gamma+\dot{\gamma}+\ddot{\gamma}

Where ω is the longitude of perihelion of the orbit, e is the eccentricity of the orbit, \gamma is a term used to represent the radial velocity offset of the system (the radial velocity of the system arising simply from its motion through space), \dot{\gamma} is any linear radial velocity trend in the data, measured in m s-1, and \ddot{\gamma} is a term for a quadratic trend in the RV data, where the RV data may be curved but not in such a way that it permits the period to be readily known. This is typically observed when the aforementioned trend has been observed long enough that it begins to show some curvature in the RV data. If there is no need for any of the \gamma terms, they may be set to zero. Lastly, K is the amplitude of the RV curve and directly corresponds to the mass of the planet through the semi-major axis of the star around the system barycentre, as well as being dependent on the unknown inclination of the system and the eccentricity of the orbit.

\displaystyle K=\frac{2\pi a_*\sin{i}}{P\sqrt{1-e^2}}

The nature of \epsilon was not expanded on in the previous aforementioned page. It represents the “eccentric anomaly” and can be understood to be representative of where the planet is in its orbit at a given time. For circular orbits such that e = 0, the eccentric anomaly is simply equal to the mean anomaly, and is understood to be 0 at the start and 2π = 360o after a full orbit. For non-circular orbits such that e > 0, then it must be calculated.

Eccentric Anomaly

Eccentric Anomaly (source)

The relationship between the mean anomaly and the eccentric anomaly is given by

\displaystyle M = \epsilon - e \sin{\epsilon}

It turns out that it’s impossible to solve for \epsilon mathematically (in the same sense that it is impossible to solve for π) so a recursive algorithm will be needed to approximate it. This algorithm is called Newton’s Method and is given as

\displaystyle x_{n+1} = x_n - \frac{f(x_n)}{f'(x_n)}

An initial guess, x0 is plugged into the algorithm and is used to determine x1, which is plugged back into the algorithm, ad infinitum. This algorithm will converge on the actual value for x regardless of the initial guess, with it returning the exact value at x, though of course after a handfull of iterations, a sufficiently close guess is arrived at to avoid the need for excessively redundant calculations. The initial guess is plugged into the original equation being solved for, divided by the initial guess plugged into the derivative of the original equation. As you might imagine from the orbit diagram above, the mean anomaly itself is a fairly decent guess at the the eccentric anomaly, so one is safe using this for x0. In the case of the expression for the eccentric anomaly, we first set the expression equal to zero: 0 = \epsilon-e\sin{\epsilon}-M and then with Newton’s Method

\displaystyle \epsilon_{n+1} = \epsilon_n - \frac{\epsilon -e\sin{\epsilon}-M}{1-e\cos{\epsilon_n}}

This may be done until \epsilon is determined to the desired precision.

Graphing the RV equation is rather straightforwad with some computer scripting, though it can be somewhat challenging with a graphing calculating given the difficulty in determining \epsilon to sufficient precision throughout the orbit (it turns out that astronomy uses both math and computers!). Let us examine how the shape of the RV curve varies with the orbital parameters (for a description of the various orbital parameters, see here). Obviously changing the period widens the the wavelength of the curve, and obviously varying K affects the amplitude. Changing the eccentricity will change the shape of the orbit significantly and will therefore affect the y-axis symmetry of the RV curve.

Manifestation of e on the RV curve

Manifestation of e on the RV curve

The “jagged” appearance of RV curves arising from eccentric planets is distinctive and difficult to replicate through other phenomena such as pulsations. As such, the RV signals from eccentric planets is less ambiguously of planetary origin than for planets in circular orbits.

Changes in the mean anomaly of the orbit simply effect a phase shift and move the RV curve of the planet along the x-axis (time axis). Changing the longitude of perihelion, ω, rotates the planetary orbit about its plane in space and therefore will cause what appears to be a phase offset to the orbit for a circular orbit, but will cause noticeable changes to the RV curve shape for eccentric planets. Changing ω for eccentric orbits causes a loss of x-axis symmetry.

Manifestation of ω on the RV curve

Manifestation of ω on the RV curve

As before, the shape of the RV curve here is hard to replicate through processes intrinsic to the star. This “sawtooth” shape of the RV curve is much more reason to believe the RV curve is due to an orbiting companion rather than other issues such as starspots or pulsations.

Now multiple planets can be modeled by simply adding multiple RV curves over each other. For a system of n planets, the RV curve is given by
\displaystyle V_r(t) = \gamma + \dot{\gamma} + \ddot{\gamma} + \sum_{i=1}^n K_i[\cos(\epsilon_i + \omega_i)+e_i\cos(\omega_i)]

Keplerian modelling of RV data is simple, fast, and computationally easy. However it leaves out very important aspects which we will look at later, such as planet-planet interactions. That being said, Keplerian fitting is still the most widely used method to deriving extrasolar planet properties from RV data.

Advertisements

Probability of Transit

Transiting Planets. Credit: NASA

Transiting Planets. Credit: NASA

Transiting planets are valuable items to explore the properties of planetary atmospheres. Planet searches like Kepler that focous on fields of sky tend to reap rewards amongst dimmer stars simply because there are many more dim stars in a given patch of the sky than bright ones. Transiting planets around bright stars are of particular value, though, as the increased brightness makes the system easier to study.

Radial velocity surveys tend to monitor brighter stars since spectroscopy is even more severely limited by stellar brightness than photometry, but it is not limited to observing patches of sky – telescopes performing Doppler spectroscopy tend to observe a single object at a time due to technical and physical limitations. Radial velocity surveys are also much less sensitive to the inclination angle of a planet orbit with respect to the plane of the sky. The planet doesn’t have to transit to be spectroscopically detectable. As such, radial velocity surveys tend to generate discoveries of planet candidates with unknown inclinations and true masses, but around much brighter stars than those planets discovered by the transit method.

As such, planet candidates discovered by radial velocity, especially planet candidates in short orbital periods are excellent targets for follow-up observations to attempt to detect transits. Transiting planets that have been discovered first through radial velocity have been of great scientific interest due to their host stellar brightness and thus ease of study. If more such systems are found, it would be of great benefit to understanding extrasolar planet atmosphere. While only a hand-full of transiting planets have been discovered first through radial velocity, they all orbit bright stars and are some of the best-characterised planets outside our solar system.

The probability that a planet will transit is, as has been discussed previously, given by
\displaystyle P_{tr} = \frac{R_*}{a}
where a is the semi-major axis of the planet orbit. This is the distance between the centre of the star and the centre of the planet. However, due to the inclination degeneracy – the reoccurring evil villain constantly plaguing radial velocity science – the star-planet separation is unknown. Remember that the period of the RV curve gives only the orbital period of the planet. If the orbital period is held constant, increasing the mass of the planet increases the star-planet separation. An increase in the total system mass requires greater separation between the two bodies to preserve the same orbital period.

For example, if radial velocity observations of a star reveal the presence of a mp sin i = 1 ME planet candidate, but the inclination is actually extremely low such that the true mass of the companion is in the stellar regime, then because the mutual gravitational attraction between the two stars will be much greater than the mutual gravitational attraction between the star and an Earth-mass planet at the same period, the two stars must have a wider separation, otherwise their orbital period would be smaller.

Mathematically, the true semi-major axis is given by
\displaystyle a = \left(\frac{G[M_*+M_{\text{pl}}(i)]}{4\pi^2}\right)^{1/3}T^{2/3}
Where G is the gravitational constant, and Mpl(i) is the mass of the planet at a given inclination i, and T is the period of the system. It is worth noting that the true semi-major axis is not significantly different from the minimum semi-major axis as long as the mass of the star is much greater than the mass of the planet – which is typically the case.

The fact that the true semi-major axis is a function of the unknown inclination makes for an interesting clarification: The probability that a planet of unknown inclination will transit is not simply given by Rstar/a, but is only approximated by it. If we assume that the distribution of planet masses is uniform (and extending through into the brown dwarf mass regime), then you would expect a planet with a minimum mass equal to Earth to have a much greater chance of being a bona-fide planet than a planet with a minimum-mass of 10 MJ, simply because there is a greater range of inclinations the former planet can be while still remaining in the planetary mass regime. Taking this a step further, even if both the Earth-mass planet candidate and the 10 Jupiter-mass planet candidate have the same orbital period, the probability that the latter planet transits ends up being less than the Earth-mass planet simply because of its high mass. Since its inclination is unknown, the probability that its mass is so high that the true semi-major axis is noticeably larger than the minimum semi-major axis is much higher, resulting in a likely lower transit probability.

Except it turns out that the mass distribution of planets and brown dwarfs isn’t constant. Earth-sized planets are significantly more common than Jupiter-sized planets, and super-Jupiters appear rare. It isn’t clear yet what the mass distribution planets actually is, with significant uncertainty in the sub-Neptune regime, but it is clear that for a highly accurate estimate of the transit probability, the inclination distribution cannot be thought of as completely random as it is fundamentally tied to the planet mass distribution.

Planet Mass Distribution

Planet Mass Distribution given by Ida & Lin (Left) and Mordasini (Right)

Consider the case of a super-Jovian planet candidate, perhaps with a minimum mass of 7 or 8 Jupiter-masses. Because a significant fraction of physically allowable inclinations would place the true mass planet into a mass regime that is in reality sparsely populated, it is less likely that the planet candidate’s orbit is in those inclinations. It is thus more likely that the planet candidate’s orbit is edge-on than would be expected from the probability function of randomly oriented orbits. As such, the transit probability of a super-Jovian planet is actually boosted by ~20 – 50% over what you would expect from Ptr = Rstar/a. If this is the case, then we would expect to find an excess in the fraction of transiting planets in this mass regime then would be expected purely from the standard transit probability function. Indeed this is what we see.

Candidate planets with masses in the terrestrial planet regime are similarly affected, with broadened transit probabilies owing to the fact that terrestrial planets are more common than higher mass planets, arguing in favour of a higher inclination than the random inclination distribution function.

On the other hand, planet or brown dwarf candidates of minimum masses in the most sparsely populated region of the mass distribution are unlikely to truly have that mass. They are quite likely in orbits with low inclinations and with much higher true masses. The transit probability for companion candidates with minimum masses in this mass regime are actually reduced from the standard transit probability function.

Geometric and a posteriori transit probabilities

Geometric and a posteriori transit probabilities

In the table above, taken from this preprint, we see that the geometric transit probability, Ptr,0, can be much less than the a posteriori transit probability, Ptr. The transit probability for 55 Cnc e, for example, jumps up from 28% to 36%. With these higher a posteriori transit probabilities, these short-period low-mass planets should be followed-up for transits. If transits are found, it would be of significant benefit to the extrasolar planet field.

In summary, there are various additional effects that can cause the a posteriori transit probability to be significantly different from the geometric transit probability. Planets with only minimum masses known can be more accurately assigned a transit probability when taking into account the uneven planetary mass distribution. Low-mass planets and super-Jupiters are more likely to transit than their geometric transit probability because a significant range of the inclination space is consumed by planets of masses that are simply rare. These planet candidates are more promising targets for transit follow-up than, for example, Jupiter-mass planets or intermediate-mass brown dwarfs.

A Potentially Habitable Planet

Kepler-62 f

Kepler-62 f

Recently, the Kepler-62 and Kepler-69 systems were made public. The first of these is quite interesting, with a Mars-sized planet sandwiched between two super-Earths in short period orbits, with two super-Earth-sized planets in or near the habitable zone further out.

A 1.6 Earth-radius planet, Kepler-62 e, is in the inner edge of the habitable zone. It’s impossible to be sure yet but it’s radius implies it could have a substantial amount of volatiles such as water. The planet may have a thick ocean layer going so deep that the pressure results in an ice layer between the liquid water layer and the rock layer, much as in Neptune-type planets.

Securely in the habitable zone, Kepler-62 f is a 1.4 Earth-radius planet. It gets about as much insolation from its star as Mars does from the sun. With a much larger radius and surely higher mass, it probably has a thicker atmosphere and so it all works out to where Kepler-62 f could very well be a habitable world.

The presence of multiple super-Earths inward of the f planet implies there has been some migration in the system, and it’s therefore possible that the f planet formed beyond the ice line and acquired a significant amount of volatiles. It’s possible Kepler-62f represents an ocean planet. Or for a slightly higher rock/water fraction, it could have continents and surface life on dry land. With what we know now, it is completely impossible to say.

Still, the fact that such a world has been found is greatly encouraging. It is by far the most promising habitable planet candidate.